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The Irrational Vocabulary of the American Professorial Class with Regard to the Holocaust Question

A review : Republican Party Animal by David Cole

Published on Monday, September 1 of 2014 by

By  Chip Smith

Coles book

Republican Party Animal is a layered chronicle of David Cole’s short but storied public career as a “Jewish Holocaust denier” and of his equally unlikely “second life” as David Stein, when he would come to play an influential role as an event organizer and Op-Ed dynamo among the guarded ranks of Hollywood conservatives before having his heretical past exposed by a vindictive ex-girlfriend. The dual biographical narratives converge in a morally conflicted tale of downfall and personal reinvention, of intersecting identities and of consequences wrought in the whirlwind momentum of a life less ordinary.

Cole’s telling is …

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Academic Freedom: Are There Limits to Inquiry?

Published on Saturday, August 30 of 2014 by

 By David W. Robinson, Ed.D.

 

On April 26, 2014, a conference was held at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois. This gathering was rather unusual in the history of such things, since it involved the discussion of a topic that isn’t talked about in American academia:  Are there boundaries to academic inquiry? This was the main theme, using JFK, 9/11 and the Holocaust as test cases, but there were ancillary questions that rose in company with it. Are there topics of research and scholarly endeavor that are outside of the pale of legitimate research? Do subjects exist …

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Dogma, Double Standards, and Doubt – The Bradley Smith Heresy and Beyond

Published on Thursday, August 28 of 2014 by

A review from 2009 of  Break His Bones: The Private Life Of A Holocaust Revisionist By Bradley Smith

By Michael K. Smith 

SEPTEMBER 2009

 

break-his-bones-the-private-life-of-a-holocaust-revisionist-99-p

 

To act is to be committed, and to be committed is to be in danger.

—–James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time

In his autobiography “Break His Bones” Bradley Smith gives us a lively and infuriating review of the Holocaust dogma that has crippled intellectual freedom in the U.S. It should be required reading for every course with an Elie Wiesel book on the class reading list. While sympathetic to Jewish suffering, it dispassionately analyzes the …

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